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added by Juaniallermann2
posted by Jillywinkles
Taken from The Greek Gods, oleh Evslin, Evslin, & Hoopes.





Aphrodite was the goddess of cinta and beauty; so there are lebih stories told about her than anyone else, god atau mortal....But all the tales agree that she is the goddess of desire, and, unlike other Olympians, is never distracted from her duties. Her work is her pleasure, her profession, her hobby. She thinks of nothing but love, and nobody expects lebih of her.


She was born....From the foam rose a tall beautiful maiden, naked and dripping. Waves attended her. Poseidon's white kuda brought her to the island of Cythera. Wherever...
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added by Juaniallermann2
added by tsukionnanoko
posted by Juaniallermann2
 Solar Apollo with Helio's halo
Solar Apollo with Helio's halo
“Helios” is just the Greek word for sun. He was also worshipped as a god oleh the Greek, especially in Rhodes. He is connected with kuda and chariots and sometimes with cattle. He is usually called the son of the Titans Hyperion and Theia atau Euryphaesssa. Prominent children ascribed to him are Phaeton, King Aeetes of Colchis, and Circe.

“Apollo” (when we first see him in Homer and other early sources) is a god of archery, hunting, prophecy, lyre-music, and dancing. He is also god of cattle-herding and plague. He is never connected with the sun. And this stays almost entirely true in...
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added by AJE123
added by oceanblueeyes
added by Uzhsah
posted by Helije
In Greek mythology, Ananke atau Anagke (Ancient Greek: Ἀνάγκη, from the common noun ἀνάγκη, force, constraint, necessity), was the personification of destiny, necessity and fate, depicted as holding a spindle. She marks the beginning of the cosmos, along with Chronos. She was seen as the most powerful dictator of all fate and circumstance which meant that the other Gods had to give her respect and pay homage as well as the mortals. She was also the mother of the Moirae, the three fates who were fathered oleh Zeus.

According to the ancient Greek traveller Pausanias, there was a temple...
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posted by Jillywinkles
Taken from A Pride of Princesses, oleh Shirley Climo.


Once upon a time, so the mythmakers said, there lived a Greek king who had three daughters. The oldest princess was very pretty. The detik princess was quite charming. The youngest princess, whose name was Psyche, was so lovely that even the bunga turned their heads to look at her.

Praise for Psyche's beauty spread throughout Greece and soon reached the ears of the gods and goddesses who dwelled high on Mount Olympus.
"Ridiculous!" scoffed the goddess Aphrodite. "This princess is only a girl. I am the Goddess of Beauty."

Aphrodite pushed aside...
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posted by princessofmagic
What if there was a goddess that no one knew about? What if she was lebih powerfull than Zeus but lebih humble than Heistia? What if she was the human spirit of the sun, goddess of impulsivness, of energy, of decisions, of motivation?

Why are there all these what if's?


The goddess in question, called Anthoria, was the oldest child of Cronus and Rhea. She is berkata to be born from not her mothers womb, but from golden sunlight that fell on her mother in labor. She gave the gods the drive and fuel to keep fighting when they needed it, and took it away from her father when he had to much. She kept...
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added by AJE123
added by otn04
added by puppy1418
added by maritina12345
added by puppy1418
posted by storm-hawk
Iphigenia is usually called the daughter of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon. Agamemnon had angered the goddess Artemis. In order to propitiate the goddess, Agamemnon had to sacrifice his daughter Iphigenia at Aulis where the Achaean fleet was impatiently waiting for a wind to menyeberang, salib over to Troy. In order to trick Iphigenia into coming, Agamemnon sent word to Clytemnestra that Iphigenia was to marry Achilles, so Clytemnestra willingly brought her daughter to the wedding/sacrifice. Iphigenia, sometimes portrayed as brave enough to impress Achilles, realized her self-sacrifice was what the Greeks needed.

In some versions of the story, Artemis saves Iphigenia at the last minute.

In revenge for the trickery and killing of their daughter Iphigenia, Clytemnestra killed her husband when he returned from the Trojan War.
added by StarWanderer
Source: https://kaynessart.deviantart.com/art/Apollo-73047730